Haiti :: Tom Gato children’s photos in (iPad) print

I’m in the run up to the opening of a new exhibition of my photography, which is why things have been a little quiet here for the last two months.  That and the fact that work’s been very very busy thankfully…

‘Haiti :: beyond the rubble’ (working title still – may change!), is running for the whole of June in the downstairs foyer of Westminster Central Hall, which is next to Westminster Abbey and opposite the Houses of Parliament in central London – great venue!  The exhibition features the work I’ve shot for Tearfund over the past year covering their work in Haiti since the January 12 earthquake, which killed around 300 000 people.  It’s an opportunity to remind people here that the situation in Haiti is still very difficult and ongoing. With the Christchurch and Japan earthquakes recently we’ve seen how much devastation can be caused in cities with fantastic infrastructure, and it’s easy for Haiti to slip from our collective memory – hopefully this exhibition will keep us engaged with what’s happening in Haiti.

As a companion piece to my work, we’re featuring a selection of images taken by children at schools in a small town called Tom Gato, which is near the top of the hill on the Leogane/Jacmel road.  In July last year I left cameras with 50 children, and asked them to take pictures of their favourite things. They came back with some fantastic images, which give an interesting glimpse into their lives. The pictures were picked up by iPad only magazine ‘Project’ (which is backed by Richard Branson – and is actually quite a funky magazine – really enjoyed reading it, after buying an iPad so I could look at the children’s pictures – I so, so needed an excuse…). If you’ve got an iPad, I recommend getting a copy of Issue 3 (though if you’re of a sensitive nature, you might find the opening video, which is hard to avoid, a little discomforting/distasteful/odd *delete as applicable).  For those of you without a shiny aluminium and glass plate of digital goodness, here are a few screengrabs of how they used the pictures – and a link to the Flickr site which hosts the larger collection of pictures.

There’ll be more about the exhibition shortly – and news of a long awaited new website in the next day or so…

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